SSi Forum

Best online Welsh/English dictionary?


#1

Any recommendations? Useful when you’re out and about and just want to look up something quickly.


#2

There are a few (and I’m sure others will list them in their favourites) but my personal preferences are these -
For English to Welsh only - Geiriadur Yr Academi
For both English to Welsh and Welsh to English - Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Llanbedr


#3

Ap Geiriaduron is the best online/ app based dictionary I’ve ever used; https://www.bangor.ac.uk/canolfanbedwyr/ap_geiriaduron.php.en

It can translate both ways, can work offline, and can search multiple sources when online. Very comprehensive, it rarely fails to find a translation.


#4

I use Geiriadur Prifisygol Cymru and Geiriadur Bangor. There are also Android apps available for both (probably iPhone too).


#5

I agree, this app is so incredibly helpful. It also lists multiple sources, helps me sort through various possible meanings and figure out if I’m looking at a verbnoun or an adjective, etc., if a word is masculine or feminine… I love it.


#6

I fear I’ll come across as a smug, consumerist-mentality, ingrate and killjoy (again), but for Irish I crave a SSi course, and yet I am absolutely in heaven with the Teanglann.ie-accessed “combined dictionary/grammar/pronunciation project” and its sister site: New English-Irish online dictionary; especially also with the back-up of the voice synthesiser of Trinity College production/genius.

None of the things I have listed comes anywhere near an empathetic/sympathetic mother tongue population (thriving) or access to an available friend/family personally committed to help learners learn. Well done, Wales, the Welsh, @aran & Co, and those upon whose shoulders, etc. You are in a very favourable position (compared with many languages that English threatened/threatens), favourable position being all thanks to forethought & commitment.

Yet it is marvellously convenient, with Irish, to have so much online and available for distant learners.

I do not wish to stop, or lessen book sales. I like a physical dictionary, indeed, a set of dictionaries. That begs a library building and service, secondary & tertiary level education supported, access and funding for libraries Adult Education, etc etc. Or I have to live in the old-fashioned pre Alexa way, as I intend to. It all depends what I can keep dry in my tent under the railway arches, that I reckon will be my next dwelling! :wink:

I have at least 5 -7*Irish dictionaries at home, none as good as online stuff (*it depends what you count as a dictionary!).

Perhaps 3 Welsh dictionaries are now in my ownership. If I bought a better & more expensive, serious Welsh dictionary, because I was doing study beyond Canolradd level, it would be in the hope that somehow I can thereby help fund the putting of great, better-linked, more thoroughly worked through help for serious learners in an online dictionary project such as Teanglann…

I am sure there is huge work being undertaken in Wales now, of which I know nothing.

In Ireland it seems to have been Eastern Europeans and Diaspora Irish as well as local enthusiasts, and perhaps government guilt for the latter stages, or base funding and foundation of the Republican state & its identity at and prior to independence, that brought their great online dictionary situation about.