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Errors on learn-welsh.net


#22

Rhewgell Folfo:

Reached Italy from Sweden, about 7 years ago. But ice had melted by the time it got here. :laughing:
And quite odd: it was probably more or less from the same year as the ones in the photo you chose, and plate including “51”. :open_mouth:

p.s. @jen sorry for the wild OT!


#23

Wow great picture; respect :sunny:

Do you still have it?

Rich :slight_smile:


#24

let me say, I can’t take credit for the choice. it’s my partner on charge of car searchin’, but I pretty much approve any old wreck! :sweat_smile:

Anyway, unfortunately it is no more (since last year). It was super cool. And a bargain, but, let’s say, there was a reason. :grimacing:

Its 1992 substitute is excellent. Living in a city, it is rarely ever used, and for lockdown it didn’t move for more two months.
But unlike many new and expensive ones, it started just fine!


#25

Icebox.

I’m not sure if it’s still the case, but that was the American English name for a refrigerator for quite a while even after the switch to electrically-powered fridges.


#26

There are obviously colloquial differences in the naming of things; Ice boxes, fridges and so on. In Australia before fridges they used an open box surrounded in fly wire that was kept outside to keep meat fresh. It was called a coolgardie safe. Later they started adding ice to boxes. But I remember someone telling me once to grab some milk from the coolgardie which was, in fact, a refrigerator … old habits I guess …


#27

In New Zealand when I was young we had a cupboard that looked like a normal cupboard on the inside, but stuck out into the open air with flywire-covered holes in the sides. That was the ‘meat safe’ and my mother used to have a large basin of cold water under the sink with the butter floating in it, plus milk bottles. I still remember the excitement of the fridge arriving, but years later when I lived in a flat in Surrey that didn’t have a fridge, I went back to my mother’s trick with the big bowl of water.


#28

I’d agree that fridge/refrigerator is oergell and you have to watch out with all of these resources, be they online or more “traditional” like a course book for a Welsh for Adults type course offered by one of the Welsh universities. None of them is perfect. They all make mistakes. Just as an example, Memrise - which is a great resource - its WJEC GCSE stage 1 Welsh teaches “dwrg” for “bad”. It’s not dwrg it’s drwg. It also teaches “draffodd” for motorway, but it should be “draffordd” (with a treiglad meddal) but that’s just two examples, so you have to watch out and it’s right to ask.


#29

Diolch