Gair y Diwrnod - Word of the Day


#223

Word of the Day 20/09/2018

As requested, here are some kitchen items…

Sieve would be either gogr or rhidyll. Both are in common use.

Gogr = gog as in pedaGOGue but with an r on the end - sounds like gogger

Rhidyll = hree-dee-ll

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#224

#225

Okay, I think this is a British English vs American English question. What (on your side of the pond) do you consider a “sieve”? I know the word but what I think of is not a kitchen thing, so I’m curious.

E2A - looking it up in GM, I think what you are talking about is what we call a sifter?


#226

Just for comparison - cause sometimes English language has so many words for basically the same thing, that I’m not sure I understand it right.

The first thing that comes to my mind is a large sifter that’s used just for flour.
But I guess it’s any sifter/colander with a mesh as opposed to what we call “colapasta” for pasta and washing vegetables!


#227

Yes, that’s it!


#228

Sieve …


Colander …

https://www.finecooking.com/article/sorting-out-strainers-colanders-vs-sieves


#229

Colander in Welsh is, rather predictively, “colandr”.

And just to confuse the matter further, “rhidyll” is also riddle which is used in the garden and looks like this …


#230

I’d call that a sieve too! Just saying.:thinking:


#231

Funny thing of you make the mesh finer on that it’s called a Tam in a professional kitchen.


#232

…and yet we all (US & UK) seem to call them sieves in the test lab:


#233

This sort of thing - outside a home kitchen - is what I’ve always thought of as a sieve. Gruntius’ “riddle” above looks more like the ones in my garage.


#234

Word(s) of the Day 24/09/2018

So we’re still in the kitchen and this time we’re bringing photos!

In addition to these two below…

Twmffat = tum-phat
Stwnsiwr = stoon-sure
Chwisg = choo-eesg (Welsh ch)
Clorian = clore-yan
Crafell = crah-vell (Welsh ll)
Gratiwr = gratt-yoor
Ysbodol = us-bod-all
Spatwla = spatt-oo-la

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#235

I can’t help seeing words like “colandr”, “spatwla” and “gratiwr” next to the words “hidlwr”, “ysbodol” and “crafell” without thinking that Welsh is such a beautiful language why would we want the former when we already have the latter.


#236

Indeed! :slight_smile:


#237

Remember this…

Well had Del Boy (aka Derek Edward Trotter) and Rodney been Welsh, then Del would have most probably called Rodney a…

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#238

@ianblandford looking very proud of himself … the twmffat! :joy:


#239

Loving Stwnshiwr
Edit: sorry no H Just stwnsiwr. Hopefully sounds the same though.


#240

Diolch yn fawr, Catrin. Twnffat, two definitions for the price of one :sunglasses:


#241

So Derek would have called Rodney a FUNNEL?!? :wink:


#242

Sorry, me again :grimacing:
I’ve just realised why I love Stwns, swnsio, etc.
It reminds me of Dunsh/Dunch. Nudge bump bash in English, but a bit dialecty now.