Irish Gaelic?


#81

I did see that haha - it sounded like a right ordeal Aran!


#82

You have such a choice of languages to swear in - luckily I don’t do Twitter. Swear Something in Manx seems appropriate for Irish Sea crossing problems…


#83

I feel Irish Ferries could benefit from sponsoring Welsh - Irish and other Celtic connections… I remember it was Brittany Ferries who sponsored musical events and recordings bringing Breton musicians together with the Chieftains decades ago. Sadly, I have not been a great traveller but if I were one of those or ever become one I think I’d be impressed by a language aware travel business/company.


#84

… if the wrath of Aran ever passes from them… :smiling_imp:


#85

Speaking from a point of ignorance, I must say that after learning Welsh some of the mutated(?) Irish letters now make sense. I’m thinking of the bh in Siobhan. OK, you are going to say “It’s not a mutation” or something :slight_smile:


#86

I’m thinking of lobbying Brittany Ferries to come and take over the Dublin-Caergybi route… :smiley:


#87

Yeah, keep it in the Brythonic family. :sunglasses:


#88

Just while you mentioned the subject, the part of Irish mutation I struggle with but find interesting (and which is different to Welsh and Scottish Gaelic) is “eclipsis” where the modified letter is placed before the original, which stays there.
For example: Welsh goes cath -> gath, but in Irish you get naoi gcat for nine cats (the original ‘c’ stays there and the ‘g’ goes on the front).
When a word begins with a capital letter and is mutated in this way, you can then end up with a lower first letter of the word and a capital second letter of the word, e.g. i nGaillimh (in Galway).


#89

gCuriouser and gcuriouser… :slight_smile:


#90

Ah! Thanks for this! I’d seen the lower-case initial followed by upper-case letter before and wondered how that came about. You’ve made it all clear for me now.


#91

Irish I am trying to reactivate in my head right now (challenged by a beginners course online Irish 102)
Irish: Is /Tá - Welsh : Mae - English : …is, there is…
Irish: Ní/Níl - Welsh : Does - English : (there) isn’t
Irish An/An bhfuil - Welsh - Oes/Ydy English : Is (there)…?
Irish Nach/Nach bhfuil - Welsh ? English : Isn’t (there)…?

That last line looks wrong for me in the Irish and the Welsh. And the single word affirmative or negative responses are not clear in my ceann/pen wedi cawlio either…


#92

As for adding question words into this lot… I have got a lot to get straight in my flipping from Irish to Welsh when I get to Llanrannog and want to avoid speaking Saesneg as much as poss…

Any ideas for getting these things straight in my mind/head/pronunciation apparatus/synapses?


#93

I guess just go with the flow when you get there. You will probably just snap over to the language after acclimatising.


#94

Reassurance much appreciated, thanks, John.


#95

I’m late to this, but I’d like to say I’d also be interested in a Gaeilge or a Gàidhlig course after I finish the Welsh. I did the Duolingo Irish course a couple of times through, but it doesn’t really prepare you for listening/speaking.