SSi Forum

Rownd a Rownd


#1422

I would prefer them to get married in the chapel where Mr Lloyd plays the organ. It shouldn’t be too difficult to arrange should it? Plenty of room in the chapel for at least their closest friends. No need for a fancy reception; just have people come back to Copa for a “gwydr neu ddai”. :slight_smile:


#1423

If it means we get to see Mr. Lloyd then I’m all for it! I’m sure word will spread, in a good way, and it will become a community effort. Nothing wrong with a small ceremony for family and friends and then everyone else being invited for the reception. Couples do it all the time. Drinks at Copa and few appetizers from the cafe. Everyone gets introduced to Aled, Sophie and Dylan can have their chat, perfect opportunity for Mathew to sit in a corner and people watch/gather information.

If the writers ever need plot suggestions just ask us :joy:


#1424

What do you teach instead of dwnim IE what does it mean, please?!!!


#1425

The actress playing Mali is not the real daughter of actress Catrin Mara - but I agree with you that they are very alike! (good casting!) - she is, however, the sister of Rhiannon, who came to the final of the Wales Junior Eurovision qualifiers - Chwilio am Seren, recently broadcast live on S4C.
The reason that many actors have names that don’t look like surnames is because they are indeed middle names, or ‘given’ surnames. This is usually because so many Welsh people are Jones, Davies, Williams etc. Many parents give their children a middle name that would work as a surname, to give the child the option of dropping their ‘boring’ surname. Also, a popular trend is to give the father’s first name as a last name for the child, which is the case for Luned Elfyn, who plays Mali. The actors playing Kylie and Robbie are indeed siblings, and go by their first and middle names.


#1426

Good to see Donna Direidi being, well, direidus. :joy:


#1427

I’ve just noticed this from last year - don’t know if you found the answer elsewhere, so…

Bod and verbs that end in ‘bod’, like gwybod, are even more weird and wonderful in Literary Welsh than in ordinary spoken Welsh, but a few of those forms creep through the cracks into actual spoken usage. Gwn is Literary for “I know” - whence am wn i ‘I suppose’, ni wn i ‘I don’t know’, and dwn i’m - also ‘I don’t know’. So you could also say dw i ddim yn gwybod, dwi’m yn gwybod, or even (apparently, in the North) wmbo :slight_smile:

Another literary form is gŵyr for ‘s/he knows’ - used in spoken Welsh in the set phrase Pwy a ŵyr? - ‘Who knows?’


#1428

My working theory. is that perhaps Jac’s father was abusive in some way, and that one day Jac’s patience snapped and he beat him up, and was imprisoned for that.

There was an episode where Jac said that’s exactly what happened


#1429

Thank you, Richard, it is taking me a while to absorb some of this, but I’m beginning to understand what are these little particles that pepper colloquial language (and, which I’d find in some form elsewhere, were I reading books etc of a highly literary sort, rather than easy materials written for learners). Real language, as used by mam iaith / mother tongue speakers in lots of localities, has so much more variety and tang to it than simplified standardised stuff!


#1430

Hello. I’m not Welsh (and I can’t speak it). I just joined this site to talk a little about Rownd.

There’s a spoiler about Dylan and Rhys in the summary on the s4c.cymru/e_listings.shtml?dt=2020-02-13 (page).

The spoiler is intriguing me but it might not be what would interest me.


#1431

You’ve done it now, Aruthr, or whatever you call yourself. The Mr Lloyd Appreciation Society has just signed up Iestyn to plan its revenge…


#1432

Rownd a Rownd is still being broadcast, which surprises me given the situation with Coronavirus. Meanwhile Pobol Y Cwm appears to have finally run out of episodes to show, and they obviously had the opportunity to keep going longer given that they normally show 5 episodes per week and must have had more ‘in the bag’ as it were. I guess R&R must stop soon and we shall all have to then wait a while before either of them return to our screens. Oh well.