Tiny questions with quick answers - continuing thread


#5076

The town of Eccles, of course, takes it’s name from Brythonic/Early Welsh (eglwys), so there’s a connection there.


#5077

Straying even further off topic - a customer bought a pack of Eccles cakes the other day. He commented that he always called them Welsh cakes because they were the same. I held my tongue, but I imagined the entire populations of Wales and Lancashire rising up in wrath.
Sue


#5078

Almost not at all :slight_smile: [Go for ‘mewn cappuccino yn well fyth’[.


#5079

Absolutely true. Actually, I don’t know anything about Italian’s preference for languages based on tonal quality. I’m agreeing that I think French, Italian, Spanish are some of the most pleasant sounding languages. Even cursing is like playing with fine silk! I was surprised when I first heard the word for Daughter in Cymraeg ‘merch.’ The ‘ch’ is very hard for something that I don’t perceive as being hard. Otherwise, I thoroughly enjoy playing with the language.


#5080

I don’t know if this has any truth in it, but I read a long time ago that Saesneg was a way of describing how the English language was irritating and annoying to the ears of the native Britons with all it’s hissing “s” sounds. ssssssneg.


#5081

I’m afraid as kids we used to call them ‘squashed fly biscuits’ (with a bit of imagination the currants looked like the remains of flies) …


#5082

Us too!


#5083

Well, based on the Wikipedia article that Richard Buck posted above, variations of that name were fairly common for those!


#5084

What would “squashed fly biscuits” translate to in Welsh, and would it be recognised as fond, affectionate, community-building “teasing tone” or might it be seen as dismissive alone?


#5085

Now there’s a question! I’ll make a stab at bisgedi gwybed wedi gwasgu for “squashed fly biscuits”, but no idea about the second part of the question - maybe calling them that would simply result in some very strange looks… :slight_smile:


#5086

:face_with_hand_over_mouth::wink::sweat_smile::joy::rofl::crazy_face::sunglasses::nerd_face::face_with_monocle::black_flag:󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿:black_flag:󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿:black_flag:󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿:black_flag:󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿:butterfly::butterfly::butterfly::butterfly::bug::bug::bug::bug:


#5087

:welsh_flag:


#5088

Regarding the mid-challenge breather interlude and also the congrats at the end of each challenge - Does anyone else find themselves starting to translate these into Welsh? :slight_smile:


#5089

Yes!


#5090

Yes, all the time!
Then often comes the “hey, I don’t remember these words from previous challenges, why is he using them?”.
Then I realize. :rofl:


#5091

Quick prounounciation question please…

CREU - Create

Is this prounounced as:
CREE (as in English CRE - ate)
CRY (as in English CRY - ing)
CRAY (as in English CRA - te)

Hope thats clear!
Diolch o galon!
Dai.


#5092

CRAY (as in English CRA - te)
well, more or less… the ‘ay’ sound is slightly ‘darker’ than the English ‘ay’ (I have no idea how to explain it better than that)


#5093

Even just for fun - I learnt it from my first pronunciation tutor :grin:.
@DaiRoberts If you’d like to give it a listen, it goes: “dyn, sydd wedi creu (…)” and once more soon after.
By the way there’s a lot of words in this song I enjoy pronouncing and were quite tricky to learn in a sequence and at that speed!


#5094

Just something that crossed my mind:
I’m guessing that we’ve dropped the 1st neu from a choice, ie don’t need it these days?

As in
(Pa un) Rwyt ti isiau neu te neu goffee -> Rwyt ti isiau te neu goffee
Meaning
(Which) do you want: tea or coffee


#5095

I’m guessing (but would be glad of confirmation) that you could still have neu de neu goffi if you meant the equivalent of English “either… or…”