SSi Forum

Tiny questions with quick answers - continuing thread


#7491

Exactly that!
Thanks, I think i’m going to adapt your sentence to my pathway and use it myself a lot. :wink:

p.s. I guess studying without learning is the right option for my German! :sweat_smile:


#7492

In case anyone’s wondering, about ‘teaching’, I’ve heard someone say dysgu fel athro on Radio Cymru


#7493

Thanks, it may always turn useful!


#7494

Hi all! I was wondering if i could clear up the use of ‘ga i…’. I think we were taught it as ‘can I have…’ but I have heard it used as ‘can i do’ as well on radio Cymru and in speech.

‘Ga i dewis can gan…’ (can I have a choice of a song??)
‘Ga i nol dishgled i chi’
‘Ga i ofyn’ (can i have a question?)

I don’t know if that makes sense, but is that what is happening here? I thought one could use ‘gallu’ instead or as an alternative?
Diolch!!


#7495

It’s probably the English “can I have” that’s tripping you up. Yes, it does mean that, but “Ga i” can also be interpreted as “May I…?”, so your examples would be
‘Ga i dewis can gan…’ - May I choose a song by…
‘Ga i nol dishgled i chi’ - May I fetch a cuppa for you (May I get you a cuppa)
‘Ga i ofyn’ - May I ask

Gallu (medru in the N) is ‘can’ in the sense of “to be able”, whereas this form of cael is ‘can’ in the sense of “am I permitted to” :slight_smile:


#7496

Ahh thank you siaron, I thought it looked like it was being used as ‘may i’…that makes a lot of sense!
Martin


#7497

Please could someone tell me what “vrapio” means? I’m sure I haven’t spelled it right.
diolch


#7498

Do you have any context or what a bit more of the sentence might have sounded like.

The nearest I can come up with so far is drabio, to cut into pieces. I think in the challenges we have Torri yn eu darnau


#7499

Is this from one of the listening exercises? It’s ringing bells with me but I can’t find it from a quick search. If it is what I’m thinking of you should be able to find the transcript and translation of it.


#7500

Got it. I couldn’t let it beat me! Go ddrapia is Damn it! It’s in listening exercise 1, North.


#7501

Level 1, Challenge 6:

If you started is wnest ti ddechrau, why doesn’t you said translate as wnest ti ddweud rather than dwedest ti? Or are they alternative forms?


#7502

You guessed it! They are alternative forms. The second is the ‘short form’ which uses specific endings to the base to make the different tenses. The first is a little easier for learners at first, but it is useful to at least be familiar with both.


#7503

In the vocabulary ‘your sister’ is dy chwaer di. I cannot find anything for your brother other than eich brawd. In the lesson it sounds like dy brawd i. Is this correct.


#7504

Yes, there are two ways of saying “your” - the familiar/singular way is “dy … (di)” (the ‘di’ is optional) and then there is the polite/plural way, “eich … (chi)” (again, the ‘chi’ is optional).
“eich” doesn’t cause any mutations to the noun that follows it, but ‘dy’ does, it causes a soft mutation on letters that take it, so you could have:
Dy chwaer (di)
Eich chwaer (chi)
Dy frawd (di)
Eich brawd (chi)


#7505

No way?? Seriously?? Damn it!! :lol:


#7506

It’s in the listening exercise and apparently it’s “damn it” lol!!


#7507

Thanks, @Sionned!


#7508

Someone who told me that… Rhywun ddwedodd wrtha’i bod…
In the challenge (16) it does not sound like that. Is the above correct?


#7509

Hiya, just working through the old course 2 and wondering-
Do Mae rhaid i fi and dw i’n gorfod mean the same or is there a difference?
Thanks!


#7510

Yes they mean the same but Dw i’n gorfod is so much easier to say that it’s no fun - so it’s not used as much :smile: (joke - they mean the same!)

Rich :slight_smile: