SSi Forum

Learn or Teach


#1

How can I differentiate between ‘learn’ and ‘teach’ in a sentence - dysgu seems to cover both?


#2

I would usually say something like “dysgu fel tiwtor” / “teach as a tutor” if the context didn’t make it clear.


#3

OK Huw, diolch yn fawr!


#4

I think ‘addysgu’ is used to mean ‘teach’ but not ‘learn’, so I always use that when I mean ‘teach’.
On the opposite side, it would be nice if there were a verb which exclusively means ‘learn’ but not ‘teach’!


#5

Another great answer - thank you Cymdraegwn.


#6

Addysg - is education so addysgu is to educate. You can use it but it’d sound similar to using educate in an English sentence. So I don’t think you can say dwi’n addysgu Ffrangeg - to replace dysgu.

If you use dysgu it’s normally understood from context, but as Huw said, fel tiwtor or something similar can help.


#7

Waw! This is certainly an “addysg” for me. OK pawb, I’ll probably stick to dysgu, I am sure from my halting conversation they will guess which I mean. Thank you everyone. :blush:


#8

See it as an opportunity to practise more Welsh by explaining :slight_smile:

Couple other phrases

i blant/oedolion (to children/adults)
mewn ysgol/coleg (in a school/college)


#9

Well, for what it’s worth, some English dialects still use “larn”, the forerunner of learn. Larn means teach and learn :slight_smile: Also a lender can either lend money from someone or to someone. So, yes, its all in the context.


#10

I’ve heard “learn them tidy” for “teach them well” in Ebbw Vale which, being my birth town, can do no wrong. :smile:


#11

And in Welsh ‘benthyg’ means both ‘to lend’ and ‘to borrow’. :slight_smile:


#12

Ah. I knew there was a reason for me remembering that :thinking: