Welsh Music Videos and Audio Files


#705

Mix - Sebona Fi - Yws Gwynedd (geiriau/lyrics):

I have always loved this fun song, especially helpful with the Welsh lyrics. I wondered if anyone has the English lyrics? I get the gist about fine food, wine and good company but it would be good to understand it all.


#706

I’m sure we can throw something together via crowd-sourcing. I don’t have time to translate it all, but I can start us off with the chorus:

Because we’re all running like rats
If you have half an hour, flatter me
And remember the same old things that worry everyone
But we’re all soil in the end

Oh life is so fine
The taste of grapes is strong in the wine
and the company is good


#707

Welsh female choir here … third of the way through


#708

Hey! Finlandia! I was very confused the first time I heard this in Welsh :smile: The video I saw didn’t have Finlandia in the title and it took me very long to realise why it sounded so familiar.


#709

Thank you very much for taking the time to do the chorus. That’s the bit I sing the most! It’s a great catchy tune, one of those you can’t get out of your head!

I guess Sebona Fi is something like soap me, lather me?

Dioch Rob, I appreciate it.


#710

No problem.

I once heard Yws trying to explain on the radio that he was using the verb seboni not literally but in the sense of flatter or indulge. I think the sense of the English soft-soap might be related: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/soft-soap


#711

Thanks Rob, made me laugh. It’s obviously more complex than I thought


#712

Go for a walk right across the sea
Take your breath, you’ll have felt the warm breeze
Like a kiss on your naked white skin

Hear nothing to open your world
Sit now, lay your head down
Everything will be OK
If you sleep through the afternoon

Sing the song that will keep us clean
Hold tight - cats and dogs are falling round your head
But remember that there’s value in your smile


#713

Canon lân!


#714

The spellcheck won again. Calon Lân!


#715

One I quite like, not really traditional but on trad style is Pan fod y nos yn hir. Or whatever the correct title is. Also, its ok to understand.


#716

I just like the rhythm and flow of the words.


#717

Ryan a Ronnie, of course. Ryan Davies used to work a lot in three-time.

See also this breathtaking version:


#718

Not for the faint-hearted:


#719

Yes, that is the case. Of course, brass bands grew up in the industrial parts of England as well, but the male choirs were much more of a Welsh thing. I guess they were extensions of the chapel tradition, and the much more ancient singing traditions that the Welsh are famous for. Even Gerallt Gymro (1146 - 1223) pointed out that if two Welsh people sang, they would never both sing the tune…


#720

Some form of choirs in Wales are said to date back to medieval times at least…no citation with me though


#721

I remember hearing that brass instruments were great for the creativity of industrial workers, owing to the nice chunky size of the valves and slides (for trombones) and also the need for some strong lung power. I guess that lung power and control has a part to play in choir singing, also.

Going back to bands and Churches/Chapels - fair play to the Salvation Army, for its part in this in Wales.


#722

And give praise to chapels for stemming the loss of the Welsh language whatever faith or not you are personally


#723

Dim ond heddiw tan yfory

Does anyone else think that the singer has the same accent as Catrin?


#724

Branwen Haf is from Llanuwchllyn/Bala.