SSi Forum

Tiny questions with quick answers - continuing thread


#7912

Are there any books/resources that help with talking to kids? I mean kiddyfying words as we do in english: dog=doggy, ta=thank you etc. I guess hanging out with other parents who are first language and passing the language on is best…


#7913

I saw a video of the cariad@iaith series (that’s quite enjoyable by the way!), where they were practising introductions.

The teacher explained that when someone says “Braf cwrdd â chi” you don’t answer “a chi” but something I couldn’t hear clearly, supposedly meaning “and yourself”.

It sounded like “a chi ffe” to me and I can’t figure it out! Anyone knows what that is?

P.s. just realized that “a chi” means “to whom” in Italian, for.a surreal chat mixing languages! :laughing:


#7914

that would be “a chithau” (and you/yourself/yourselves) - it’s like an ‘super-pronoun’ and is used when you want particular contrast, balance or emphasis, and also applies to other pronouns:
a finnau (and me/myself) and sometimes you’ll also hear innau/minnau
a tithau (and you/yourself - singular/familiar) and sometimes you’ll also hear dithau
ac yntau/fintau (and him/himself)
a hithau (and her/herself)
a ninnau (and us/ourselves)
a nhwthau (and them/themselves)


#7915

A thithau?


#7916

technically yes, ‘and’ would cause an aspirate mutation, but it’s often left out.


#7917

I understand it’s one of those cases where English is confusing because it doesn’t make the distinction.

When I heard him translate it as “yourself” I thought of “eich hunan”.

Bu what’s the difference with chitau, then?
Is this always referring to something or someone?


#7918

“and yourself” is a bit of a loose translation - probably better to think of it as an emphasised “and you too” or an “and also you”


#7919

Hi Debora,

This is a choice that i’m going to suggest not a definite need to change. I’d opt for diwrnod priodas, just feels more natural to me.

Hope the wedding goes well :slight_smile:


#7920

for those wondering about dydd vs diwrnod…

dydd - technically the daylight part of the day
diwrnod - technically the whole 24hours of the day

(diwrnod does feel more natural when talking about a wedding day because you’re usually referring to the whole day. however, I stuck with dydd because of the context - “I hope you’ve had a fantastic wedding day” followed by “here’s to a brilliant evening” )


#7921

Hi there :slightly_smiling_face:

I’m Swiss and a huge fan of Scotland! I just love this country since many years and travelled 6 times through the lowlands, highlands, east coast, west coast, the isles…etc.

I think, my english is good enough to have conversations and for writing (appologies for any mistakes🙂).

But now, I’m searching for a specific translation into Scottish Gaelic.:slightly_smiling_face: Of course I don’t have any knowledge in Gaelic (yet…) and I hope you can do me a favour.

Actually, I’ve already made some research. An old friend of mine I haven´t seen since many years, she learned Scottish Gaelic. She even asked some other Gaelic-speaking friends.

But I just want to make sure, I’ve really got the right translation. Cause, depending which online-translator you’re using, it gives me different results - of course.

I’m searching for the translation of “guardian angel” or as we would say in german “Schutzengel”.

My friend gave me the translation “càr-aingeal”.

But I also found “Aingeal an Neach-dìon” which actually leads to some google results like jewelery or gealic websites.

Maybe both is correct, but with a difference in the understanding or meaning. In german we’ve got the one word for it, which is a little bit more “spiritual”.

But I also can live with a meaning like “protector”, “guardian”…

Would be happy if you could help me out.:slightly_smiling_face: Thanks in advance and kind regards,

Thomas


#7922

Hello Thomas.
You’ve posted this in a Welsh category, and although we do have Welsh learners here who also learn Scottish Gaelic, most of us don’t so you might get more replies if you start a new topic in the ‘Other Languages’ category here https://forum.saysomethingin.com/c/other-languages

Having said that, I’ll tag @desscholes here for you as he may be able to help :slight_smile:


#7924

Hi Siaron, ough… embarassing :grimacing: - very sorry for that and thank you very much for your reply!
I´ve posted in the other category too and I’m looking forward to any replys :slight_smile: :+1:


#7925

No need to be embarrassed - the forum is huge and it takes a while to find your way around - and I just wanted to maximise your chance of replies! Hope you get some responses soon :slight_smile:


#7926

I’m obsessed with the song “Llwytha’r Gwn” by Candelas at the minute :joy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ecBnIWXyZc&list=RDt
As well as it being a great song, for someone like me who is largely learning mutations in a relaxed way/the SSiW way/through osmosis :joy: the chorus is a real gift:

Wy’ ti’n dal i weld cysgodion yn y nos?
Wy’ ti’n dal i grio yn dy freuddwydion?
Wy’ ti’n dal i weld cysgodion yn y nos?
A’n dal i wrando ar fy hen ganeuon, fy hen ganeuon

But its not the mutations that have got my ears twitching at the moment, but the last line where ac + yn has turned to “a’n”… Is this poetic/musical licence, or do people say “a’n” instead of “ac yn”? :slight_smile:


#7927

I’d guess it’s poetic/musical licence here (maybe turning two syllables into one for a better scan or not wanting the c for “cynhaneddol” purposes) because I think a’n is more often an abbreviation of ac ein - but it’s always possible I hear a’n for ac yn more often than I think I do!


#7928

Thanks Siaron! We’ll keep our ears peeled! :rofl:


#7929

Delicious!


#7930

Quick question. I know Dros Ben translates as ‘over the top’ but is it used in any other context.
I hear it being used on TV but it doesn’t seem to fit in what is being talked about.
Diolch.


#7931

It’s also used to add emphasis when you want to express things like ‘extremely’, ‘very’. It’s also part of other idioms e.g. tin dros ben = head over heels

Here’s the list that the Trinity Saint David dictionary gives, to give you an idea of various usages:
https://geiriadur.uwtsd.ac.uk/index.php?page=ateb&term=dros+ben&direction=we&type=all&whichpart=part&search=#ateb_top


#7932

Thanks Siaron :blush: